India successfully launches PSLV-C49 rocket, earth observation satellite EOS-01

India on Saturday successfully placed into orbit one more eye in the sky — a radar imaging earth observation satellite EOS-01 (formerly RISAT-2BR2) — and nine other foreign satellites in a text book style.

India’s new earth observation satellite up in the sky will send good clarity images which will be used for agriculture, forestry and disaster management support, said Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the country’s space agency.

The images captured by the satellite will also be used for surveillance purposes while ISRO is silent on this aspect.

The EOS-01 with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can shoot pictures in all weather conditions.

The satellite can take pictures day and night and will be useful for surveillance as well as civilian activities.

At 3.12 p.m the PSLV-C49 rocket, with lift off weight of 259 ton and standing around 44.4 metres tall with a one-way ticket hurtled itself towards the skies ferrying the EOS-01, which is is a 630 kg earth observation satellite.

Piggybacking on that were the nine foreign satellites from: Lithuania (1-R2, technology demonstrator), Luxembourg (4 maritime application satellites by Kleos Space) and the US (4-Lemur multi mission remote sensing satellites).

With the fierce orange flame at its tail, the rocket slowly gathered speed and went up while the rocket’s engine noise like a rolling thunder adding to the thrill.

At 3.31 p.m. the rocket ejected EOS-01, followed by the nine other foreign satellites.

Cumulatively till date ISRO has put into orbit 328 foreign satellites all for a fee.

The PSLV in normal configuration is a four stage/engine expendable rocket powered by solid and liquid fuels alternatively with six booster motors strapped on to the first stage to give higher thrust during the initial flight moments.

But the 44.4 metre tall PSLV rocket that flew on Saturday was the DL variant having only two strap-booster motors.

This rocket variant was used the first time to put the Microsat R satellite into orbit on January 24, 2019.

The Indian space agency has PSLV variants with two and four strap-on motors, larger PSLV-XL and the Core Alone variant without any strap-on motors.

The choice of the rocket to be used for a mission depends on the weight of the satellite and the orbit where the satellite has to be orbited.

PM congratulates ISRO for successful launch of PSLV-C49/EOS-01 Mission

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday congratulated the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the country’s space industry for the successful launch of the PSLV-C49 rocket and the placing of radar imaging earth observation satellite EOS-01 into the orbit.

“I congratulate ISRO and India’s space industry for the successful launch of PSLV-C49/EOS-01 Mission today. In the time of Covid-19, our scientists overcame many constraints to meet the deadline,” the Prime Minister tweeted.

“Nine satellites, including four each from the US and Luxembourg and one from Lithuania, have also been launched in the Mission,” he said in another tweet.

India on Saturday successfully placed into orbit EOS-01, and nine other foreign satellites in a text book style.

India’s new earth observation satellite will send good clarity images, which will be used for agriculture, forestry and disaster management support, ISRO said.

The EOS-01 with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can shoot pictures in all weather conditions.

The satellite can take pictures day and night and will be useful for surveillance as well as civilian activities.

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Arushi Sana is the Co Founder of NYK Daily. She was a Forensic Data Analyst previously employed with EY (Ernst & Young). She aims to develop a global community of knowledge and journalism par excellence through this News Platform. Arushi holds a degree in Computer Science Engineering. She is also a Mentor for women suffering from Mental Health, and helps them in becoming published authors. Helping and educating people always came naturally to Arushi. She is a writer, political researcher, a social worker and a singer with a flair for languages. Travel and nature are the biggest spiritual getaways for her. She believes Yoga and communication can make the world a better place, and is optimistic of a bright yet mysterious future!

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